Remain crowd aloof under a roof

An extract from a Freedom Asociation email by Simon Richards:

I thought that the Remoaners trying to ruin the Last Night of the Proms by waving EU flags would make my blood boil.

After all, nothing angered me more, during last year’s EU referendum, than Harriet Baldwin, the Conservative MP for West Worcestershire, putting a Vote Remain t-shirt on the statue of Sir Edward Elgar in Malvern. Unlike her, I would not presume to know how that great man would have voted, though the fact that he was a fiercely patriotic right-wing Conservative might serve as a clue. But Harriet Baldwin, like so many Remainers, was as clueless about Elgar as she was about her own constituents – Elgar’s beloved county voted heavily for Leave. 

So why did those promenaders frantically waving their EU flags not make me angry? In truth, I felt rather sorry for them; they looked so ridiculous waving their alien flags during that great English hymn, Jerusalem. They looked as out of place as people turning up to Ascot in shorts.

What made me grateful to these Remoaners was the contrast between the ‘in’ crowd of metropolitan types under cover in the Royal Albert Hall and the vastly bigger and more representative crowds of ‘ordinary’, patriotic Britons singing and cheering in Hyde Park and in a typically rain-soaked Swansea. There I struggled to spot a single EU flag. They waved their Union Jacks and English and Welsh flags with gusto. And, even in Glasgow and Northern Ireland, the Prom crowds had spurned the opportunity to sport the yellow stars of the EU.

It was a reminder of why the vocal, pro-EU, metropolitan elite lost the EU referendum last year. Thank you for that, Remoaners. Then, as now, the bulk of the British people voted for the country that they can and do believe in, rather than the European superstate that they either detest or fail to connect with.

  1 comment for “Remain crowd aloof under a roof

  1. Paul Marks
    Sep 12, 2017 at 10:26 am

    Yes – it was just silly rather than offensive.

    The instinct was to laugh (as if people were waving Chinese flags at a Japanese event, or mistakenly waving Brazilian flags during an Argentine tango) rather than be angry.

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